NaNoWriMo Interviews 2015 Recap

This year, throughout the month of November and going into early December, we published 16 interviews with writers, asking them a bit about themselves and National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). On some days, we published more than one interview. In case you missed any, here is a complete list with links:

Drew Avera
Jonathan Bergeron
Carol Gyzander
Axel Kohagen
Anna L. Davis
Amanda L. Baker
Dawn Chapman
JJ Shelton
Daniel Moore
Cheryce Clayton
Jeffery Cook
Vanessa Knipe
Jane Lebak
Rebekah Raymond
JL Sarchet
Christina L. Rozelle

You can download all of these interviews in one convenient PDF here.

Did you enjoy reading these interviews? Would you like us to make these interviews an annual thing? Are there any of these writers you’d like us to have back for a more personalized interview? Let us know in the comments or on social media.

JL Sarchet NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

I’m a writer from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At the moment, I’m living in South Korea and teaching English as a Foreign Language to middle school students. During the day, I teach academic writing, but my passion is storytelling. In my spare time I write speculative fiction novels.

How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

I have done NaNoWriMo every year since 2006 and have managed to cross that 50,000 word mark each time. Each year I start strong, get distracted by life for most of the month, and then spend a hellish weekend pounding out the rest of the novel. This is my tenth attempt and I hope it will be my tenth win.

What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

Although I am not new to NaNo, I am new to writing science fiction and especially cyberpunk. I’m pantsing my way through the first draft of a novel about cyborg boxers who take on a fight against the corrupt corporation that sponsors them (after they stumble across a deep, dark secret, of course!) and I’m having a great time learning more about boxing.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

My job keeps me a bit too busy during the week to hit the recommended 1667 on a daily basis. In fact, most years I would let several days go by without writing a word, but often had trouble getting back into the flow of the story. I would say that this year, my focus can be attributed to two things: I set a minimum word count of 100 words a day. That’s it. I usually tapped it out on my morning bus ride using Evernote on my phone. It kept the story fresh and moving forward AND it gave me a sense of accomplishment. And even if I didn’t write another word that day, I had reached my personal goal. I can silence my inner editor. Believe me when I say as an English teacher, it can be difficult look at a passage filled with typos, spelling mistakes, grammar mishaps, and missing quotation marks. For the pace required to finish NaNoWriMo, I have to be able to ignore it. When I write I literally mutter to myself, “You can fix it. Later.” That ‘later’ part is the key. On December 1st, I can switch into search and destroy mode. If I could offer any advice to someone attempting NaNo it would mirror the two things I mentioned above. 1) Find a way to keep your story moving forward, no matter how slowly. Chip away at it. And 2) DO. NOT. EDIT. Turn off the inner editor and just get the story on the page. You don’t have time to doubt yourself. Write.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that?

Right now, the best way to track me down is via the Writerpunk facebook group. I’m currently working on a few submissions for the anthologies produced by Writerpunk Press, all of which are classic stories reimagined with cyberpunk elements.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Yes. If there is anyone out there who has taken on the challenge and thinks that they can’t make a huge comeback in a short amount of time, just know that it is possible. I’m in the final weekend of NaNoWriMo. I have over 22,000 words to write but only 50 hours (at the time of this writing) to do it in. Normally this amount of work and this deadline should cause panic. And if I didn’t already know I can close the gap and cross the finish line, I would really be freaking out right now.

You’ve got to keep fighting for it. Pour another cup of coffee and keep writing. You can sleep in December. Or, if you’re as caffeinated as I am, January.

 

Rebekah Raymond NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

I live in Calgary, Alberta Canada. I am married to my high school sweetheart, and we have two children together. I am a creative, an artist, writer, and author. I thrive on music and written word, read obsessively, and have many eclectic interests. I have my Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, have worked in both professional and artists endeavours, and pride myself on always growing, always learning.

How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

I tried NaNoWriMo for the first time November 2014. I joined late, November 10, and by the 18th I still had 30,000 words to go. But, I succeeded with the help of many late nights. I also participated in Camp NaNoWriMo since then (and completed them successfully)

What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

This November I am working on starting Book Four of my Life’s Series. As well, I am continuing to work on the novella which is the backstory of one of the beloved characters from Book One. They are thrillers, bordering on horror in some ways, although based on what has been written so far I think a romance classification may need to be considered in there as well. They hint to science fiction as well, with a dystopian aspect to a world in the future.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

This year has been especially difficult to stay on track. But, I am trying to stick to a writing schedule, so that I don’t fall too far behind. For anyone wanting to try NaNoWriMo I have two different sets of advice. 1) for those wanting to attempt and be successful with a 50,000 word count: try to stick to the suggested 1667 or more words per day. This will ensure you don’t fall too far behind. 2) for those who simply want to try it and aren’t too concerned about meeting the word count goal: just have fun. Struggling to meet the 50,000 words can be daunting sometimes and it is often near the finish line that writers give up, thinking there is no way they can do it. Here’s the thing – whether you write 3,000 words or 85,000, you are winning. All because you have picked up that pen and paper, tablet, phone, laptop, and started to write. And that’s what NaNoWriMo is all about.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that?

Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/authorRebekahRaymond
Twitter: @RRaymondAuthor
Website: http://rebekahraymond.com

Life’s Defeat (Life’s Series: Book One) Purchase links
Amazon (available through all amazon stores): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B014CJ0BBW
Kobo: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-ca/ebook/life-s-defeat
In Canada – paperback purchase: http://www.owlsnestbooks.com/
or through my website (above)

Jane Lebak NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

I’m Jane Lebak. I write books and I knit socks. Not at the same time. I’m also one of the bloggers for Querytracker.net, a resource for writers seeking agents.

How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

I’ve attempted NaNoWriMo twice before this year and after both experiences I swore not to do it again. I was able to get my 50,000 words in November, but at the expense of being able to complete the book at all. I’ve learned I need to take a “literary pause” every so often to gather my emotional strength to keep writing, and if I can’t do that, I’ll hit my word count but will start to burn out. I did it in 2005 and 2006 but didn’t finish either of those books until this year. (They’re both published now.) While I have no problems doing 100K in 90 days, 50K in 30 days was just too quick for me. This year, though, something changed.

What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

My WIP for Nano this year is a book in the Seven Archangels series. It takes place about twenty years after the events in Sacred Cups, but it stands alone if you didn’t read the previous books. The archangels have learned that the demons are developing a new weapon, so they infiltrate Hell to find out what it is. They end up accidentally setting it off, leaving two of the angels and one of the demons disabled. Now they need to figure out what that weapon was and what it did in order to reverse the process, and to prevent the enemy from setting it off again.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

What’s different this year about Nanowrimo is that I’m now a full-time writer with all my kids in school during the daytime. I’ve given myself permission not to hit my word count on the days where I need to do that “literary pause” thing. What I’m doing now is making sure I enter at least some words every day, but on days when I need to relax, I’ll do only a couple hundred. On other days, though, I’ll go to 2500 or 3000 in order to give myself the cushion so I can take those days off when I need them. So far, it’s working. I couldn’t have done this before when I had children on top of me all day long, so that just goes to show that writing has seasons and sometimes we need to lower our expectations based on our life duties.

If you want to do NaNoWriMo, I think you need to know what your own limits are and figure out in advance how to work around them. Build them into your actual writing plan as needs rather than blithely hoping everything will just line up. Budget for your own weaknesses, whatever they are. If you’ve never written a book before, and you don’t know what your writing weaknesses might be, then just focus on putting words down. They don’t have to be good: they just have to be written. You can clean up that draft afterward.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that?

I’ve got a neglected website at http://www.janelebak.com, but my books are available at http://amazon.com/author/janelebak. I’m on twitter at http://twitter.com/janelebak and on Facebook at http://facebook.com/JaneLebakAuthor

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Be gentle on yourself and remember that NaNoWriMo is an arbitrary goal. There’s nothing magical about 50K in 30 days. If you have to slow down or back off in order to protect your story, remember that your story is more valuable than hitting a goal that doesn’t matter anyhow. Give yourself permission to fail, keeping in mind that 30,000 words or 20,000 words is hardly a failure. It’s a great start, and you just need to find your own ideal pace to finish your novel.

 

Vanessa Knipe NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

I’m a widow with an Autistic teenage son. I had to take to writing when my husband was killed because I couldn’t work night shifts at the NHS with a toddler. I have six published books, 4 with a US indie publisher and 2 with a UK indie publisher.

How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

I have participated in NaNoWriMo every year since 2007. I have succeeded each year.

What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

I am writing the 4th book in my Six book space saga. Two great theocracies of Genetically Modified Humans fight over the crumbling remains of the Congress of Human Colonised Worlds. In book 4 a world hit by a planetbuster, which sets off every volcano on the planet, is colonised by the GM humans designed to live in those extreme conditions. The other theocracy of GM humans seeks to drive the colonists from the planet.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

I insist on writing at least 2000 words every day in November. I put a song with a pounding, racing beat on repeat and my fingers move in time to the rhythm. If anyone wanted to attempt NaNoWriMo, I would suggest finding a group on social media who can groan along with you and encourage you when you are down.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that?

My website.
My facebook page.  
My amazon page.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

NaNoWriMo is a great way to get a first draft out. Writing is a lonely business but for November you have company and encouragement.

Jeffery Cook NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

I was born in Boulder, Colorado, settled down in the Seattle area a decade or two ago, and in between lived all over the U.S. and Canada. My wife, our housemate, and I have three large dogs. They’re rescues from a PAWS animal shelter, now the beneficiaries of the charity anthologies I’m heading up with Writerpunk Press.

I’m the author of the alternate-history/Emergent Steampunk epistolary series Dawn of Steam along with a YA Fantasy series, a YA sci-fi thriller, and a decidedly not-YA urban fantasy.

How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

This is my 7th NaNoWriMo. I’ve succeeded in the word-count goal every time, though I haven’t always published the results. I don’t think I’ve ever been quite as dramatic as my first, in 2009. My editor-now-turned-co-writer loves to go on about how much I lost sleep and turned off the more grammatical parts of my brain to write the rough drafts of the Dawn of Steam trilogy.

Each year, I have appreciated how supportive the Seattle-area NaNoWriMo community and the international community have been.

What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

This year’s primary NaNo project (I’m actually multi-tasking on a few stories) is A Fair Fight, the third book of my YA Fantasy series, the Fair Folk Chronicles. The first, Foul is Fair, was released this year, and the second, Street Fair, is coming out in January.

Having seen our ADHD Faerie Princess through adventures involving two of the Four Treasures of Ireland in two Lost Cities on two holidays (Halloween and the Summer Solstice), my co-writer Katherine and I are working on sending her questing after another in time for May Day of her senior year of high school. Throughout the series, we’ve tried to go a little beyond Celtic mythology into world folklore, particularly touching on Hawaiian menhune, but A Fair Fight is our opportunity to really broaden things a little.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

This time around, I’m just trying to find some calm within the general storm of marketing six books and the charity anthologies while living in a noisy house. I do a lot of my writing in the wee hours of morning when everyone else in the house has gone to bed.
There are several important things to remember to get through NaNoWriMo.

One is that, as the late Sir Terry Pratchett said, the first draft is just you telling yourself the story.  Another is to make sure to find the time to write every day, even if some days you can only manage a little while. Another is to set relaxation rewards for after you’ve gotten some writing done.

One particular caution is not to worry too much about how everyone else is doing. The community motivation of NaNo is great, but there’s no point dwelling on the people who are faster or may just have more time on their hands. It’s your own goal that matters.

And in the end, have fun with it.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that?

www.clockworkdragon.net is a great consortium of speculative fiction writers with whom I’m involved.

My official author facebook is www.facebook.com/dawnofsteamtrilogy, but my personal account is easily found for friending through things like the Writerpunk community. Writerpunk also has a site at www.punkwriters.com

My amazon author page is  http://www.amazon.com/Jeffrey-Cook/e/B00IRMC3H6/
www.authorjeffreycook.com is having longterm update and coding issues, but should be fixed eventually.

And on Twitter, @jeffreycook74

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Once More Unto the Breach: Shakespeare Goes Punk 2 is coming out at the beginning of December. It is the follow up to this spring’s Sound & Fury: Shakespeare Goes Punk. In the first anthology, alongside colleagues with a Cyberpunk Macbeth and a Dieselpunk Othello, Katherine and I did our Steampunk version of “The Winter’s Tale,” with 500% more being pursued by a bear. For Once More… we did more dieselpunk adaptations. Katherine helped me write “Dogs of War,” a Mad-Max-like rendition of “Julius Caesar,” and I helped her write an “As You Like It” with an alternate-Dust-Bowl twist.

All profits go to PAWS. The first anthology has been used to fund a large dog kennel for a year, and we hope to double that next year.

Cheryce Clayton NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

Cheryce Clayton, writer

Oh, more?

I once named a company PoshRat, it means half-blood and out of culture in Romani. I can remember my great grandfather speaking Choctaw, I’ve spent more years living on Reservations than off, I speak a few words, I go to a couple of PowWows a year, and I know how to bead. And yet I always feel like I’m on the outside looking at a circle of old friends gathered around a fire, not quite sure how to join in and feeling too tall to blend in.

As a writer?

I am not defined as a writer by the facts that that I am a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, that I have spent my life as a trans / bi-sexual woman, that I write speculative fiction, horror, and erotica, that I live with chronic pain, or that I am a survivor of violence.

I am defined as a writer by the stories I write and my first book Obligations is a gender confused story of crossed cultures and the myths of childhood that haunt and hold us back, my webcomic Tales from the Zombpocalypse: Living in the Quarantine Zone starts seven years after the hyped zombie apocalypse as life goes on in a new normal, and the story LowRez is as much a coming of age tale on a future Reservation as my attempt to look forward and project the current Idle No More stand into the cultural vanishing point.

How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

Last year was my first NaMo. Yes. The Quiet Ones is at the copy editor right now and I’m planning on a January release.

What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

I wanted to write two separate novellas, but it’s looking like the first project is going to go long. Surviving the Trans-Human Mechaphilia Riots is a mystery noir / cyberpunk story about a beat up old Marine turned gumshoe trying to solve a murder before he gets murdered with a bit of tastefully written erotica thrown in. It’s a straight line plot /1st person POV which is a challenge for me as I usually write complex head hopping plots with multiple flashbacks.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

I have a dedicated writing time 5 days a week. Just write. The difference between a pro and a dreamer is typing The End, everything else can be fixed in the edit.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that?

http://www.amazon.com/Cheryce-Clayton/e/B00O07C20K/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

https://sixpointpress.wordpress.com

https://www.facebook.com/cheryceclayton/

https://www.facebook.com/TalesfromtheZombieApocalypse/

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

I have a bit of a canned rant about NaMo; as a ghost writer, several of my past contracts have been people who finished a NaMo novel, bragged it up to friends, and then paid to get it rewritten into something readable.  I’ve also seen too many newer writers give up on writing when they perceived themselves as a failure for not completing 50K words on schedule.  NaMo is a good tool for learning and reinforcing good writing habits but its just a tool and if it doesn’t work for you that doesn’t  mean anything bad about you. Scribner doesn’t work for me, but it’s a great tool for others.

My webcomic TZA: Living in the Quarantine Zone will be restarting soon – go catch up on the backstory!

Daniel Moore NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

I’m a freelance writer, working primarily for business clients, though I’ve written for just about every market. I’ve been writing fiction on and off since I was about seven or so. Genres shifted for me a lot, especially as my reading interests matured along with me, but there hasn’t been an era in my life where I haven’t tried to utilize storytelling as an art in some way.

How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

NaNoWriMo and I have something of a shaky relationship. I’ve attempted it in the past with great ambition, but there’s only so much one can actually get done in thirty days, even less if they have daily obligations. But that’s a big part of learning to write as an art form, I believe. Looking at stories purely from the position of imagining, the plot can easily be lost under grandiose set pieces and actions that can overcook a narrative and make it largely unusable for most audiences. Learning to write a lean manuscript is a process every writer has to go through, and it’s the only way to complete this challenge with your sanity in tact.

What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

This year’s attempt has not yet been titled. It’s something I generally struggle until I reach that moment when I consider a piece to be “done.”

What I’m working on now is an attempt at melding archaic notions of the occult with modern (and soon-to-be) technological advancements, and see how both superstition and science shape societies, peoples, and realities. I’ve always been fascinated by the seemingly combative nature with which science and the supernatural are presented by evangelists of each. And while one is empirical and the other is rooted in faith of the unknown, it doesn’t necessarily influence all people in the same way. That, to me, is an interesting breeding ground for both conflict and exploration. What else could be better suited for telling a good story?

Without giving too much away, as I hope to get this one to market at some point in the coming year, this story will explore seats of power caught in the pull of developments in technology and debunked superstitious notions that were once believed essential for governmental control. This will also be approached by someone in the population that would be controlled by those same powers.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

Scheduling helps. Dedicating a set amount of hours for a certain number of days a week is a tested method for success. I liken building a manuscript to the process an athlete goes through. Yes there are many things you must do throughout the day, some spontaneous, others promoted by love for the sport. But in order for an athlete to remain in shape, they need a proper diet and a strict regimen they’re willing to stick to. Same applies here. I write six days a week, read daily, and take one day to simply turn my mind off from everything associated with my work.

Even if I love my writing, I need a break from it to  maintain my sanity.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that?

I’m a writer and editor with Neon Dystopia where I cover technology, pop culture as it relates to technology and human interaction, and occasionally drift off to more esoteric topics. And, like everyone else on earth, you can find me on Facebook and Twitter.

JJ Shelton NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

Grinning and unrepentant Code-Monkey by day, Photographer by night, and writer everywhere in between. I live in Philadelphia, PA and work for an indie publisher in Phoenix, AZ called Spiral Ink Comics writing Hooded Cobra. I’m finishing up the script for Issue #6 at the same time as I work on NaNo this year.
How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

I’ve made four attempts in the past and had three successes. 2015 marks my fifth time participating.
What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

Hooded Cobra: Ring of Fire (working title) is a novelization of the first six issues of the comic Hooded Cobra: The Den of Serpents. The story mixes Sumerian legend with a touch of science fiction and modern day conspiracy theory to construct a political landscape littered with secret organizations and shadow governments readily manipulating and destroying human lives to their own ends. Roughly 6,000 years ago the Anunnaki came to Earth to mine gold to save their atmosphere and created humans to provide labor. Eventually the Anunnaki left, leaving behind two factions — one following Enlil who believed humans were a mistake that needed to be eradicated, and another following Enki with a desire to protect mankind. Living deep underground, the world is unaware of their existence.

The followers of Enki — here referred to as “The Den of Serpents” — use human agents known as “Hooded Cobras” to affect the world around them so as to maintain their secrecy. As the followers of Enlil work to exterminate between 40% and 70% of the world’s population in one, fell swoop the book focuses on two agents in particular — an ex-marine (a deserter) named “R.J.” and his diminutive, twin Desert-Eagle wielding counterpart known as “Kensa” — as they work to put a stop to the coming storm.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

I have a routine that I follow even when I’m not participating in NaNoWriMo. For me it’s sitting at the computer with Rant Radio Industrial streaming through my headphones, and a distraction-free word processor set to full screen. I stay connected in case I need to do research, but otherwise it’s mostly typing whatever words come to mind.

If I were to offer any advice it would be to write first, edit later. The words don’t have to make sense necessarily–nor do they have to be perfect–but the do have to be on the page for them to count. Get a routine going, get comfortable, and–if you have to–write whatever comes to mind. Write about your bad day, your good day, your significant other’s cooking… Just get writing. From there just have faith. The words will come.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that?

My Author’s Facebook Page — “JJ Shelton” — is here: https://www.facebook.com/js2072/
I’m on NaNoWriMo.org as “withoutsin”.
You can watch what’s happening with Spiral Ink Comics here: https://www.facebook.com/SpiralInkComics/

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

3.13.3.1-1.1.1.12-2.15.1.10

Dawn Chapman NaNoWriMo Interview

First of all, tell us a little about yourself.

My name’s Dawn Chapman. I’m from the UK and happily married to my long suffering, non-writer husband, Paul. We live in a bungalow, with our IRN parrot and 30 Koi all of which are spoiled rotten by me.

How many times have you attempted NaNoWriMo? Have you succeeded in the past?

I’ve attempted NaNoWriMo every year from 2010, when they stopped ScriptFrenzy. I used to be a part of that event every April, but they closed it down. So, November became my writing month. I succeeded in 2010, failed in 2011, and then won every year since. Only more recently, this year, taking up Camp NaNoWriMo in April.

What can you tell us about your current work in progress for this year’s NaNoWriMo?

I really wasn’t going to write this year, I’ve a lot on, with TSK Productions Ltd. and could do without pushing myself, but as part of our ‘Members only Section’ for the main Secret King website, we’re running short snippets of our TSK characters, some of which I penned this year as my camp nano project.
And this one particular character and her story just stuck in my head. She’s from far into the future of TSK but is hounding me to get her story out there and to write. So, I took a little time in October and plotted out her novel, with maybe the intention of actually writing it.

How are you keeping yourself focused and on track for NaNoWriMo? What advice would you offer to someone else who wanted to attempt it?

I know I have a lot on this month, so I attempted a 10k day on the 1st of the month. I use the nano chat rooms a lot and have made some amazing friends from all over the world in there. In particular, the rooms tagged #melbnano #PhillyWrimos, #nanoelsewhereau #swissnanos, and #HuNoWriMo the latter being a room which my local region are having a competition with. However, I’m a friendly person and have found they’re just as amazing as everyone else, they helped me win my 10k day. My plan now is to just try and do the min word count though, I tend to write more at the weekends, but I have a day job and that takes up lots of my energy during the week.

My tip would be write little and often. Set yourself a timer, and go, then take a break and go again. The chat room ‘bot’ Timmy is great for this, and the encouragement of others helps to. But if you’re on your own, timing is everything.

If our readers wanted to follow you and your work, what would be the best way to do that? 

I can be found at and followed at the following places. I’m about the internet a lot, with my writing and other hobbies.

Websites
Production Website: http://www.tskproductions.com/

Main TSK Website: http://www.thesecretking.com/

Personal: www.kanundra.com

Twitter
Production: https://twitter.com/ProductionsTSK
TSK: https://twitter.com/TeamSecretKing

Facebook
TSK Productions Ltd: https://www.facebook.com/TSKProductionsLtd

My AuthorPage:
https://www.facebook.com/Dawn-Chapman-550448201632777/

The Secret King Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Secret-King/836723299691777

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

NaNoWriMo 2012 was my defining year, I penned TSK- Letháo then, finishing the 84k by my birthday in December. In January I dedicated all my time to revising that novel, putting my script writing aside. It took me two years, through beta, then copy and proofing, and then for us as a company to publish it in Sep 2015. But we’re very proud of our work and have put our best foot forward. The rest of the series is shaping up very nicely. We’re also extatic to be publishing our constructed language’s grammar and dictionary as an extra before Xmas this year, written by the talented, Trent Pehrson. Watch this space… more to come.